Thoughts 4

Apathy is a terrible quality to possess. Forcing energy – If a drill/exercise is actually engaging, then energy doesn’t need to be forced.  Do athletes need to cheer each other on during a snap down or layup line?  No.  If they are maxing on squats, energy will come naturally.  If they are executing a competitive drill,…

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Muscle Remembers: Why Gains Come Back Easy After Time Off

If you take time away from lifting, what will happen to your gains?  And when you get back to training, how long will it take to get your muscle back? Researchers at Keele University looked into these questions. Hypothesis Skeletal muscle ‘remembers’ periods of muscle growth, making it easier to gain back muscle after taking time…

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Speed Strength: 10 Takeaways

From Joel Smith’s book: Speed Strength: A Comprehensive Guide to the Biomechanics and Training Methodology of Linear Speed 1) “Athletic posture” seen in all primal movements (acceleration, jumping, top-end speed, and Oly lifting second pull) is not what is traditionally taught Joel and Adarian Barr say athletic posture has a few features: 1) the xiphoid forward,…

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Thoughts 3

Post-Activation Potentiation (PAP): Do we need to use general fitness means (linear sprints, jumps, med ball throws) or can we execute a few short, maximal effort football, basketball, tennis, etc. game scenarios? The latter would be better because game technique and tactics would be used. We can’t use training means from ‘back in the day’ because…

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Gold from Douglas Heel

“If you’re defending, you can’t be performing.” “Whatever is in the mind is in the body.”  “Whatever is in the body is in the mind.” “The captain of the ship – it’s your brain” When you’re stressed out – “Chances are, when you’re trying to teach a new pattern, the brain says ‘sorry, mate, I…

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Thoughts 2

Young kids sit in class for hours then immediately sprint during recess.  Yet grown athletes need a 15-minute dynamic warm-up to prepare for activity.  Is this because older athletes are more “developed” and therefore take longer to get going?  Or is it because kids want to play and older athletes don’t really want to train/practice?  Psychology affects physiology.…

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Relaxed People Have an Easier Time Putting on Muscle

Interesting correlation with people who get the gains. Note about the autonomic nervous system:  It operates in two branches.  Parasympathetic (rest and digest) and Sympathetic (Fight or Flight).  Parasympathetic-dominant people are relaxed.  Sympathetic-dominant people are not (Type A personality).  This explanation is not 100% the way it is, but it allows for a basic understanding.…

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10 Takeaways: Raymond Verheijen’s Course (Strength Coach Perspective)

“Football” = “Soccer”, not to be confused with “American Football” 1. Double Standards Two coaches showed up late to the seminar.  Raymond called them out and they laughed about it, thinking he was joking.  He wasn’t.  What if athletes showed up 15 minutes late to a workout?  So why is it okay for coaches to…

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Thoughts

If injuries are caused by accumulated fatigue, when is the point that warm-up/activation/injury reduction drills help (by preparing for activity) or hurt (by adding fatigue)? “Good” sprint technique for a team sport athlete (soccer, basketball, etc.) involves low center of mass, short strides, and a forward lean to allow for unpredictable changes of direction.  But…

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The Playmaker’s Advantage: 8 Takeaways

Takeaways from The Playmaker’s Advantage: How to Raise Your Mental Game to the Next Level: 1) Physicality or athlete cognition – what is more effective to focus on? “We spend a disproportionate amount of time trying to grow muscle and increase speed when the payoff would be much greater by focusing on cognitive instructions and…

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